Why Knee Replacement Surgery Is So Important

The human body is an amazing machine. It serves as the Vehicle of Life. As with all vehicles, it requires care and maintenance to achieve health and longevity. Often, the most used/ abused parts of the vehicle are the shock absorbers, or, in the case of the human vehicle: the knees.

Your knee is basically a fulcrum between two levers, your femur and your tibia. It is the largest single joint in your body, operated by a system of ligaments and tendons, powered by strong thigh muscles, to keep you mobile and stable in your upright position. Your knees bear your entire body’s weight, which is compounded mathematically as you walk and run.

As you age, the amazing machine wears out. The knee is particularly susceptible to repetitive injury that can cause cumulative damage over time. Many seniors suffer from osteo or rheumatoid arthritis. If you have an active life, knee pain or weakness can really put a cramp in it. If you have tried different shoes, exercise, elevation, rest, heat, ice, anti-inflammatories, pain medications, herbs, bee stings, magnets, crystals, wraps, braces, canes, crutches, walkers… it may be time for a knee replacement.

Before you run screaming from the operating theater, new technology has developed both procedures and prostheses that take “Frankenstein” out of the picture, and present a much more pleasant screenplay for your arthroscopy. Recovery times are minimal and parts last much longer these days.

What Is A Knee Replacement

If only one side of the knee is damaged and the leg is healthy otherwise, a partial knee replacement may be done. In the case of severe damage, complex revision knee replacement may be necessary. A total knee replacement (TKR) involves removal and replacement of the entire joint. Some ligaments, cartilage, and any damaged tissue are removed. The femur and tibia are cut to shape, and a metal prosthetic joint is affixed to the bone with screws or surgical cement. The patella may be replaced, resurfaced, or simply reattached. The ligaments must be balanced to ensure stability, alignment, and range of motion.